Traditional recipes

Shrimp Creole

Shrimp Creole


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Thinkstock/Hemera

Created by New York City's Kamal Rose and former NFL player Bill Ard, this shrimp recipe is a true representation of its New Orleans surroundings. A dirty rice filled with chicken liver, kidney beans, and aromatics makes it stand out from most versions of the Southern specialty.

Ingredients

For the shrimp creole

  • 1 green bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 3 stalks celery, chopped
  • 3 Tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 Pound butter
  • 3 Ounces tomato paste
  • 1 1/2 Tablespoon smoked paprika
  • 2 Cups shrimp stock
  • 1 Pound Gulf shrimp
  • Salt and pepper, to taste

For the dirty rice

  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1 Pound chicken livers
  • 2 Tablespoons canola oil
  • 1 Pound short-grain rice
  • 4 Cups chicken stock
  • 1 Pound small kidney beans
  • Salt and pepper, to taste

Servings4

Calories Per Serving1665

Folate equivalent (total)1204µg100%


Shrimp Creole Recipe

To be quite honest, there are certain dishes that I never intended to include on this site because they have been so completely bastardized by restaurants across the country. Shrimp Creole is near the top of the list. Why would I want to include this dish? Everyone has a recipe for it. A lot of restaurants, even outside of Louisiana serve it. Why in the hell do I even want to bother? Everyone knows what Shrimp Creole is!

But then it dawned on me. You know what? Maybe because of all the hack versions out there, a lot of people, especially outside of Louisiana, don’t know how great Shrimp Creole can be! Every bad rendition of Shrimp Creole, just like Shrimp Etouffee, served in some dive restaurants across the country, have created a perception to the diner that this dish is just OK, or in the worst case scenario, absolutely horrible. For God’s sake, some restaurants even serve shrimp covered in canned Marinara sauce and pass it off as Shrimp Creole. Yikes.

There are a lot of good and bad recipes for Shrimp Creole out there, hopefully you will enjoy this one as much as I do. The defining factor that I think makes this dish great, instead of just good, in addition to the use of the highest quality Louisiana or Gulf Shrimp, is using homemade Shrimp Stock in place of water during the preparation of your Creole Sauce.

All that aside, on to the dish…

As I see it, Shrimp Creole and Shrimp Sauce Piquant are pretty much the same dish, with a few differences.

First, Shrimp Creole, or as it was once known, Shrimp a la Creole, is a New Orleans dish. Shrimp Sauce Piquant is Acadian, much spicier (hence the name) and usually, but not always containing a roux. But as I said, they’re pretty darned similar, and like most dishes in New Orleans these days the two cuisines have kind of merged in a lot of different areas. Like any dish that there are a trillion recipes for, it’s all a matter of your personal taste.

Like I always say, let’s not fight, it’s only dinner after all, just make sure it tastes good.

Shrimp Creole Recipe

2 lbs. Peeled and Deveined Shrimp, save shells to make Shrimp Stock
2 Tbsp Butter
1 Tbsp Vegetable Oil
1 Large Onion, finely chopped
2 Ribs Celery, finely chopped
1 small Green Pepper, finely Chopped
2 Tbsp Creole Seasoning
2 Tbsp Tomato Paste
2-1/2 Cups Very Ripe Fresh Tomatoes, Diced
1/2 Cup Dry White Wine
2 Cups Shrimp Stock (recipe here)
2 Tbsp Garlic, minced
2 Bay leaves
Cayenne to taste
Diamond Crystal Kosher Salt to taste
1 tsp Black Pepper
1 tsp White Pepper
1 bunch Fresh Thyme
2 Tbsp Tabasco
1 Tbsp Worcestershire Sauce
1/2 Cup Green Onions, green tops thinly sliced, white part sliced into 1/4″ thickness
1/8 Cup Flat Leaf Parsley, minced
1 Recipe Creole Boiled Rice

Melt the butter in a large sauce pan with the vegetable oil over medium high heat. When the butter begins to froth add 1/2 cup of the onions. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions are golden brown. Add the remaining onions, celery, and bell pepper, reduce the heat to medium and season with 1 Tbsp Creole Seasoning and a healthy pinch of salt. Sweat the vegetables until soft.

Add the tomato paste mixing well, and cook, stirring constantly, until the paste begins to brown, then add the fresh tomatoes and another healthy pinch of Kosher salt, this will help the tomatoes break down. Stir well.

When the tomatoes start to break down into liquid add the white wine, and turn the heat to high until most of the alcohol burns off. Add the Shrimp Stock, remaining Creole seasoning, garlic, bay leaves, black pepper, white pepper, cayenne (to taste), and Thyme. Bring to a boil then reduce to a low simmer. Simmer for 30-45 minutes.

(If necessary at this point thicken the sauce with 1 Tbsp Cornstarch/ 2Tbsp water. Bring to a boil to maximize the thickening power of the cornstarch.)

Add the hot sauce, Worcestershire, and season to taste with Kosher salt. Last chance to re-season your sauce, remember that good cooking is all about proper seasoning. Make your Boiled Rice, and season your shrimp with 1 Tbsp Kosher salt and a pinch of Cayenne.

Bring the sauce to a boil, reduce the heat to low and add the shrimp. The key is to not overcook your shrimp. Let them slowly simmer in the sauce until just cooked through.

Serve with boiled rice and garnish with the remaining green onions and parsley.

Be sure and check out my ever growing Index of Creole & Cajun Recipes, which provides links to all of the recipes featured on this site!


Recipe Summary

  • ⅔ cup vegetable oil
  • ¾ cup all-purpose flour
  • 2 cups finely chopped onion
  • 6 cloves garlic, diced
  • 1 cup finely chopped celery
  • 1 cup finely chopped green bell pepper
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 lemon, juiced
  • 1 (6 ounce) can tomato paste
  • 1 (10 ounce) can diced tomatoes with green chile peppers
  • 3 pounds shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • ground black pepper to taste
  • salt to taste
  • chili powder to taste
  • hot sauce to taste

In a medium saucepan, over medium heat, pour in oil and flour to make a roux. Cook together until smooth, stirring constantly, but do not brown.

Stir in onions and saute for 2 minutes. Stir in garlic, celery, bell pepper, bay leaves, lemon juice, tomato paste, tomatoes and shrimp. Add enough water just to cover.

Cook slowly until shrimp are pink and tender stirring occasionally. Season with salt, pepper, chili powder and hot sauce to taste.


Shrimp Creole is a New Orleans classic for a Mardi Gras that’s anything but normal

Recently, a reader chastised me for using FOMO in our Washington Post Recipes newsletter that comes out every Saturday morning.

He wrote: “What does FOMO mean? I hate when writers use abbreviations without first explaining ….” Well, if you’re a newsletter subscriber and it bothered you, too, let’s clear this up right now. It means fear of missing out … and I’ve got it bad right now.

Today is Mardi Gras. For a New Orleans native like me, that usually means a day of costuming, hanging out with family and friends, catching beads at parades, eating yummy food, listening to great music and so much great people-watching.

This year, even if I were in my hometown, due to the pandemic, the parades have been canceled, gatherings have been curtailed and the city has shut down the bars on one of the busiest days of the year.

We’ve all been living with what feels like perpetual FOMO, but if this pandemic has taught us anything, it is that we have to make the best of the hand we have been dealt.

In the Crescent City, residents did that by creating what some are calling “Yardi Gras” or “house floats.” They’ve decked out their homes with papier-mâché flower and jesters, inflated octopus legs and giant images of the city’s icons, such as Professor Longhair and chef Leah Chase. (Think elaborate Christmas decorations, but in the Carnival colors of purple, green and gold.) This way, folks could walk or drive by the houses rather than pine for the canceled parades that usually roll past them.

As for me, I’m taking the day off. I will put on my furry cat ears and paint whiskers on my face, click on my New Orleans and Carnival music playlist and make a big pot of New Orleans comfort food.

That’s where this Shrimp Creole comes in. This recipe is adapted from one served as a special at Lil Dizzy’s Cafe in New Orleans, which had been run by Wayne Baquet Sr. and his wife, Janet, since 2005.

The couple, who had shut down the restaurant in March and did limited community feeding contract work due to the pandemic, had decided to sell or close the restaurant famous for its trout Baquet and bountiful buffet. That is until their son, Wayne Baquet Jr., and their daughter-in-law, Arkesha Baquet, stepped in and agreed to keep it going. New Orleanians breathed a sigh of relief.

Lil Dizzy’s may be just 15 years old, but, as food writer Ian McNulty wrote in the Times-Picayune and Advocate, the Baquet family’s roots in the city’s restaurant scene are deep: “News of the restaurant’s closing brought an outpouring of gratitude for all the memories through the years, but also grief. It was not just the loss of another restaurant in a year that has claimed many but also the end of a family tradition in New Orleans hospitality, one that dates from the 1940s and stands as one of the city’s longest-running Black business legacies.”

Now, thanks to another generation picking up the mantle, Lil Dizzy’s was slated to reopen Monday, just in time for Mardi Gras, with a truncated menu and service changes to accommodate social distancing and safety.

“It was fun, but it’s time for a changing of the guard,” said Wayne Baquet Sr., who has been in the restaurant business for more than 50 years. He was ready to retire, but he says it is gratifying to know that the Baquet name will remain part of the city’s rich dining scene.

As I was deciding what to make for my Mardi-Gras-from-afar feast, it seemed fitting to flip through the self-published “The Baquet Family Cookbook” to find a dish that would celebrate that past and the joy of knowing that at least one favorite spot, if the gods smile on us, will be bustling and busy when Mardi Gras 2022 rolls around.

The cookbook’s recipes come from the Baquets as well as Janet’s family, the Jourdains. The Shrimp Creole is from Janet’s mother, Elsie Jourdain. “She cooked that every Friday when we were coming up,” she said. The couple assured me the Shrimp Creole will be back as a special on Lil Dizzy’s menu.

This one-pot dish, similar to an étouffée but with the addition of tomatoes, comes together in about 45 minutes, fewer if you buy your shrimp already peeled and deveined. That makes it a great dish for any weeknight. (It is an ideal dish as we move into the Lent, when some observant Christians abstain from meat, especially on Fridays.)

Following the Lil Dizzy’s recipe, I strayed from the way I usually make it, adding thyme, lemon juice and tomato sauce, as directed. (I couldn’t help myself, though — I had to add diced tomatoes, too. Janet Baquet said her mother didn’t use whole tomatoes, because, as kids, they loved the smooth gravy, no chunks for them.) As I suspected, those few extra ingredients add depth and nuance to the sauce.


Shrimp Creole Recipe

To be quite honest, there are certain dishes that I never intended to include on this site because they have been so completely bastardized by restaurants across the country. Shrimp Creole is near the top of the list. Why would I want to include this dish? Everyone has a recipe for it. A lot of restaurants, even outside of Louisiana serve it. Why in the hell do I even want to bother? Everyone knows what Shrimp Creole is!

But then it dawned on me. You know what? Maybe because of all the hack versions out there, a lot of people, especially outside of Louisiana, don’t know how great Shrimp Creole can be! Every bad rendition of Shrimp Creole, just like Shrimp Etouffee, served in some dive restaurants across the country, have created a perception to the diner that this dish is just OK, or in the worst case scenario, absolutely horrible. For God’s sake, some restaurants even serve shrimp covered in canned Marinara sauce and pass it off as Shrimp Creole. Yikes.

There are a lot of good and bad recipes for Shrimp Creole out there, hopefully you will enjoy this one as much as I do. The defining factor that I think makes this dish great, instead of just good, in addition to the use of the highest quality Louisiana or Gulf Shrimp, is using homemade Shrimp Stock in place of water during the preparation of your Creole Sauce.

All that aside, on to the dish…

As I see it, Shrimp Creole and Shrimp Sauce Piquant are pretty much the same dish, with a few differences.

First, Shrimp Creole, or as it was once known, Shrimp a la Creole, is a New Orleans dish. Shrimp Sauce Piquant is Acadian, much spicier (hence the name) and usually, but not always containing a roux. But as I said, they’re pretty darned similar, and like most dishes in New Orleans these days the two cuisines have kind of merged in a lot of different areas. Like any dish that there are a trillion recipes for, it’s all a matter of your personal taste.

Like I always say, let’s not fight, it’s only dinner after all, just make sure it tastes good.

Shrimp Creole Recipe

2 lbs. Peeled and Deveined Shrimp, save shells to make Shrimp Stock
2 Tbsp Butter
1 Tbsp Vegetable Oil
1 Large Onion, finely chopped
2 Ribs Celery, finely chopped
1 small Green Pepper, finely Chopped
2 Tbsp Creole Seasoning
2 Tbsp Tomato Paste
2-1/2 Cups Very Ripe Fresh Tomatoes, Diced
1/2 Cup Dry White Wine
2 Cups Shrimp Stock (recipe here)
2 Tbsp Garlic, minced
2 Bay leaves
Cayenne to taste
Diamond Crystal Kosher Salt to taste
1 tsp Black Pepper
1 tsp White Pepper
1 bunch Fresh Thyme
2 Tbsp Tabasco
1 Tbsp Worcestershire Sauce
1/2 Cup Green Onions, green tops thinly sliced, white part sliced into 1/4″ thickness
1/8 Cup Flat Leaf Parsley, minced
1 Recipe Creole Boiled Rice

Melt the butter in a large sauce pan with the vegetable oil over medium high heat. When the butter begins to froth add 1/2 cup of the onions. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions are golden brown. Add the remaining onions, celery, and bell pepper, reduce the heat to medium and season with 1 Tbsp Creole Seasoning and a healthy pinch of salt. Sweat the vegetables until soft.

Add the tomato paste mixing well, and cook, stirring constantly, until the paste begins to brown, then add the fresh tomatoes and another healthy pinch of Kosher salt, this will help the tomatoes break down. Stir well.

When the tomatoes start to break down into liquid add the white wine, and turn the heat to high until most of the alcohol burns off. Add the Shrimp Stock, remaining Creole seasoning, garlic, bay leaves, black pepper, white pepper, cayenne (to taste), and Thyme. Bring to a boil then reduce to a low simmer. Simmer for 30-45 minutes.

(If necessary at this point thicken the sauce with 1 Tbsp Cornstarch/ 2Tbsp water. Bring to a boil to maximize the thickening power of the cornstarch.)

Add the hot sauce, Worcestershire, and season to taste with Kosher salt. Last chance to re-season your sauce, remember that good cooking is all about proper seasoning. Make your Boiled Rice, and season your shrimp with 1 Tbsp Kosher salt and a pinch of Cayenne.

Bring the sauce to a boil, reduce the heat to low and add the shrimp. The key is to not overcook your shrimp. Let them slowly simmer in the sauce until just cooked through.

Serve with boiled rice and garnish with the remaining green onions and parsley.

Be sure and check out my ever growing Index of Creole & Cajun Recipes, which provides links to all of the recipes featured on this site!


Ingredients

    • 3 garlic cloves, minced
    • 2 large onions, chopped fine
    • 1 cup finely chopped celery (about 2 stalks)
    • 1 red bell pepper, cut into ½-inch dice
    • ½ green bell pepper, cut into ½-inch dice
    • 2 tablespoons olive oil
    • 2 cups chicken broth
    • 1 (28-ounce) can whole tomatoes, drained and chopped
    • 1 bay leaf
    • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
    • 1 teaspoon salt, or to taste
    • ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
    • 1½ pounds large shrimp (about 32), shelled and deveined
    • Accompaniment: 1 cup uncooked rice, prepared according to package instructions but without butter or margarine

Shrimp Creole Ingredients

  • 2 lbs of peeled shrimp
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil
  • 3 medium tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 cup of fresh parsley, chopped
  • 2 onions, chopped
  • 1 bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 stick of celery, chopped
  • 2 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1 Tbsp Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 Tbsp garlic sauce
  • 15 oz. can of tomato sauce to taste
  • 1/2 cup chardonnay

The chardonnay can be substituted with other white wines…

However, we wouldn’t use too sweet of a wine.


Shrimp Creole Recipe

A Louisiana inspired dish of cooked shrimp in a mixture of whole or diced tomatoes, the &ldquoholy trinity&rdquo of onion, celery and bell pepper, spiced with hot pepper sauce and/or cayenne-based seasoning, and served over steamed or boiled white rice.

Ingredients

  • 1 TBSP extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 medium onion diced
  • 2 ribs of celery diced
  • 1/2 cup parsley chopped
  • 1 green bell pepper diced
  • 2 cups seafood stock or chicken stock
  • 2 cloves of garlic minced
  • 1 15 ounce can of diced tomatoes
  • 1 cup tomato juice
  • 1/2 tsp Worcestershire sauce
  • 1/2 tsp hot sauce
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper powder more or less to taste
  • 1/2 tsp ground black pepper
  • 1 pound of medium peeled and deveined shrimp
  • 3 cups cooked white rice

Instructions

Add stock, garlic, tomatoes and tomato juice and simmer 5 minutes.

Season mixture with Worcestershire sauce, hot sauce, salt, and cayenne pepper powder and cook for 20 minutes.

Add shrimp and cook an additional 5 minutes, or until shrimp are curled, pink and tender.


Recipe Summary

  • 1 pound fresh or frozen medium shrimp in shells
  • 1 medium onion, chopped (1/2 cup)
  • ½ cup chopped celery
  • ½ cup chopped green sweet pepper
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 tablespoons butter or margarine
  • 1 ounce can diced tomatoes, undrained
  • ½ teaspoon paprika
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ⅛ teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 2 tablespoons snipped fresh parsley
  • 2 cups hot cooked rice

Thaw shrimp, if frozen. Peel and devein shrimp, removing tails. Rinse shrimp pat dry with paper towels. Set aside.

In a large skillet cook onion, celery, sweet pepper, and garlic in butter over medium heat about 5 minutes or until tender. Stir in undrained tomatoes, paprika, salt, and cayenne pepper. Bring to boiling reduce heat. Simmer, uncovered, for 5 to 8 minutes or until thickened.

Stir shrimp and parsley into tomato mixture. Cook, stirring frequently, for 2 to 4 minutes or until shrimp turn opaque. Seaston to taste. Serve over rice.


Can I prep this ahead of time?

Yes! This has to be one of the easiest dinners to prepare ahead. There are a couple of options depending on your time.

You can chop the onion, bell pepper and celery and store in ziplock bags in the refrigerator until you are ready. Or if you already know you don’t have the time for that, buy the vegetables already chopped in the produce section of your grocery store.

The shrimp can be cleaned up to 3 days ahead or buy fresh frozen cleaned and devein. You’ll just need to defrost when you are ready to cook!

If you are looking for a quick and easy dinner with all your favorite Cajun flavors, this Shrimp Creole is for you! It’s made in one-pot and in just 30 minutes, but you would never know it based on the epic amounts of flavor packed in each bite.


The Best Shrimp Creole

Sharing The Best Shrimp Creole! Friends, this is IT! This New Orleans-inspired dish is one I&rsquove been making for clients for as long as I&rsquove been a personal chef and this recipe never fails to please!


Watch the video: Κάνε Τέλειες Ψητές Γαρίδες u0026 Ευχαρίστησε την Παρέα σου. Tips του Λευτέρη Λαζάρου (July 2022).


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