Traditional recipes

Japan’s New Halloween Cheeseburger Licks You Back

Japan’s New Halloween Cheeseburger Licks You Back


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The new burger has purple sauce and a giant bacon “tongue”

Lotteria's new Halloween cheeseburger has a big glop of purple sauce and a giant strip of bacon meant to look like a monster's lolling tongue.

You can always trust Japanese burger chain Lotteria to deliver with the weird burgers, and this year’s Halloween special is not kidding around. The “Purple Magic Bacon Double Excellent Cheeseburger” is topped with purple sauce and comes in a coffin-shaped purple box, which is just right for accommodating a big strip of bacon meant to look like a lolling tongue.

According to Rocket News 24, the Halloween burger will be available from October 6 to October 31 for about $8, including fries. It has two beef patties, two slices with cheese, a huge piece of smoked bacon meant to give it a “monster-like” look, and a glop of purple sauce on top.

The purple sauce seems questionable, but actually it’s just the chain’s regular cheese sauce, made purple with the addition of some powdered purple potato.

The vampire-themed packaging and food styling make it look like a monstrous Halloween burger, but really it’s just a double cheeseburger with a big piece of bacon, and there’s nothing wrong with that.


Ronald McDonald Has A Different Name In Japan

He's started a new life in the Land Of The Rising Sun.

Ronald McDonald, that cheeseburger-slinging maestro of McFlurries, has a completely different identity in Japan. Okay, so it's not that different, but after searches for "What is Ronald McDonald called in Japan?" spiked in Google searches today, we had to know: What is he called? And is this just another internet hoax-turned-headline?!

Turns out, it's true. It's not like he's assuming a new identity, forced into the Big Mac Protection Program after too many run-ins with the Hamburglar. In Japan, he's very much the same McDonald you see in the States: Same red hair, same ketchup-and-mustard-colored garb, even down to the same last name. The only change is that in Japan, he's Donald McDonald, or rather, Donarudo Makudonarudo. Similarly, the chain's charity, the Ronald McDonald House, is known as the Donald McDonald House there.

This decision was made back in 1971, when a businessman who helped open the country's first Mickey D's suggested the swap, deeming it easier to pronounce, according to Business Insider.

While some say that's because it's hard for Japanese speakers to pronounce the letter "r" as it sounds in the English language, Kotaku explains that's an oversimplification. Ronald McDonald in Japanese is Ronarudo Makudonarudo, and having the "Ro" sound so close to the "ru" sound would trip people up, because the very similar &mdash yet different &mdash sounds don't quite roll off the tongue, the site argues. Plus, Japanese audiences were already familiar with "Donarudo," thanks to Donald Duck's popularity when the chain opened there, so it was a more natural fit.

Follow Delish on Instagram.


Ronald McDonald Has A Different Name In Japan

He's started a new life in the Land Of The Rising Sun.

Ronald McDonald, that cheeseburger-slinging maestro of McFlurries, has a completely different identity in Japan. Okay, so it's not that different, but after searches for "What is Ronald McDonald called in Japan?" spiked in Google searches today, we had to know: What is he called? And is this just another internet hoax-turned-headline?!

Turns out, it's true. It's not like he's assuming a new identity, forced into the Big Mac Protection Program after too many run-ins with the Hamburglar. In Japan, he's very much the same McDonald you see in the States: Same red hair, same ketchup-and-mustard-colored garb, even down to the same last name. The only change is that in Japan, he's Donald McDonald, or rather, Donarudo Makudonarudo. Similarly, the chain's charity, the Ronald McDonald House, is known as the Donald McDonald House there.

This decision was made back in 1971, when a businessman who helped open the country's first Mickey D's suggested the swap, deeming it easier to pronounce, according to Business Insider.

While some say that's because it's hard for Japanese speakers to pronounce the letter "r" as it sounds in the English language, Kotaku explains that's an oversimplification. Ronald McDonald in Japanese is Ronarudo Makudonarudo, and having the "Ro" sound so close to the "ru" sound would trip people up, because the very similar &mdash yet different &mdash sounds don't quite roll off the tongue, the site argues. Plus, Japanese audiences were already familiar with "Donarudo," thanks to Donald Duck's popularity when the chain opened there, so it was a more natural fit.

Follow Delish on Instagram.


Ronald McDonald Has A Different Name In Japan

He's started a new life in the Land Of The Rising Sun.

Ronald McDonald, that cheeseburger-slinging maestro of McFlurries, has a completely different identity in Japan. Okay, so it's not that different, but after searches for "What is Ronald McDonald called in Japan?" spiked in Google searches today, we had to know: What is he called? And is this just another internet hoax-turned-headline?!

Turns out, it's true. It's not like he's assuming a new identity, forced into the Big Mac Protection Program after too many run-ins with the Hamburglar. In Japan, he's very much the same McDonald you see in the States: Same red hair, same ketchup-and-mustard-colored garb, even down to the same last name. The only change is that in Japan, he's Donald McDonald, or rather, Donarudo Makudonarudo. Similarly, the chain's charity, the Ronald McDonald House, is known as the Donald McDonald House there.

This decision was made back in 1971, when a businessman who helped open the country's first Mickey D's suggested the swap, deeming it easier to pronounce, according to Business Insider.

While some say that's because it's hard for Japanese speakers to pronounce the letter "r" as it sounds in the English language, Kotaku explains that's an oversimplification. Ronald McDonald in Japanese is Ronarudo Makudonarudo, and having the "Ro" sound so close to the "ru" sound would trip people up, because the very similar &mdash yet different &mdash sounds don't quite roll off the tongue, the site argues. Plus, Japanese audiences were already familiar with "Donarudo," thanks to Donald Duck's popularity when the chain opened there, so it was a more natural fit.

Follow Delish on Instagram.


Ronald McDonald Has A Different Name In Japan

He's started a new life in the Land Of The Rising Sun.

Ronald McDonald, that cheeseburger-slinging maestro of McFlurries, has a completely different identity in Japan. Okay, so it's not that different, but after searches for "What is Ronald McDonald called in Japan?" spiked in Google searches today, we had to know: What is he called? And is this just another internet hoax-turned-headline?!

Turns out, it's true. It's not like he's assuming a new identity, forced into the Big Mac Protection Program after too many run-ins with the Hamburglar. In Japan, he's very much the same McDonald you see in the States: Same red hair, same ketchup-and-mustard-colored garb, even down to the same last name. The only change is that in Japan, he's Donald McDonald, or rather, Donarudo Makudonarudo. Similarly, the chain's charity, the Ronald McDonald House, is known as the Donald McDonald House there.

This decision was made back in 1971, when a businessman who helped open the country's first Mickey D's suggested the swap, deeming it easier to pronounce, according to Business Insider.

While some say that's because it's hard for Japanese speakers to pronounce the letter "r" as it sounds in the English language, Kotaku explains that's an oversimplification. Ronald McDonald in Japanese is Ronarudo Makudonarudo, and having the "Ro" sound so close to the "ru" sound would trip people up, because the very similar &mdash yet different &mdash sounds don't quite roll off the tongue, the site argues. Plus, Japanese audiences were already familiar with "Donarudo," thanks to Donald Duck's popularity when the chain opened there, so it was a more natural fit.

Follow Delish on Instagram.


Ronald McDonald Has A Different Name In Japan

He's started a new life in the Land Of The Rising Sun.

Ronald McDonald, that cheeseburger-slinging maestro of McFlurries, has a completely different identity in Japan. Okay, so it's not that different, but after searches for "What is Ronald McDonald called in Japan?" spiked in Google searches today, we had to know: What is he called? And is this just another internet hoax-turned-headline?!

Turns out, it's true. It's not like he's assuming a new identity, forced into the Big Mac Protection Program after too many run-ins with the Hamburglar. In Japan, he's very much the same McDonald you see in the States: Same red hair, same ketchup-and-mustard-colored garb, even down to the same last name. The only change is that in Japan, he's Donald McDonald, or rather, Donarudo Makudonarudo. Similarly, the chain's charity, the Ronald McDonald House, is known as the Donald McDonald House there.

This decision was made back in 1971, when a businessman who helped open the country's first Mickey D's suggested the swap, deeming it easier to pronounce, according to Business Insider.

While some say that's because it's hard for Japanese speakers to pronounce the letter "r" as it sounds in the English language, Kotaku explains that's an oversimplification. Ronald McDonald in Japanese is Ronarudo Makudonarudo, and having the "Ro" sound so close to the "ru" sound would trip people up, because the very similar &mdash yet different &mdash sounds don't quite roll off the tongue, the site argues. Plus, Japanese audiences were already familiar with "Donarudo," thanks to Donald Duck's popularity when the chain opened there, so it was a more natural fit.

Follow Delish on Instagram.


Ronald McDonald Has A Different Name In Japan

He's started a new life in the Land Of The Rising Sun.

Ronald McDonald, that cheeseburger-slinging maestro of McFlurries, has a completely different identity in Japan. Okay, so it's not that different, but after searches for "What is Ronald McDonald called in Japan?" spiked in Google searches today, we had to know: What is he called? And is this just another internet hoax-turned-headline?!

Turns out, it's true. It's not like he's assuming a new identity, forced into the Big Mac Protection Program after too many run-ins with the Hamburglar. In Japan, he's very much the same McDonald you see in the States: Same red hair, same ketchup-and-mustard-colored garb, even down to the same last name. The only change is that in Japan, he's Donald McDonald, or rather, Donarudo Makudonarudo. Similarly, the chain's charity, the Ronald McDonald House, is known as the Donald McDonald House there.

This decision was made back in 1971, when a businessman who helped open the country's first Mickey D's suggested the swap, deeming it easier to pronounce, according to Business Insider.

While some say that's because it's hard for Japanese speakers to pronounce the letter "r" as it sounds in the English language, Kotaku explains that's an oversimplification. Ronald McDonald in Japanese is Ronarudo Makudonarudo, and having the "Ro" sound so close to the "ru" sound would trip people up, because the very similar &mdash yet different &mdash sounds don't quite roll off the tongue, the site argues. Plus, Japanese audiences were already familiar with "Donarudo," thanks to Donald Duck's popularity when the chain opened there, so it was a more natural fit.

Follow Delish on Instagram.


Ronald McDonald Has A Different Name In Japan

He's started a new life in the Land Of The Rising Sun.

Ronald McDonald, that cheeseburger-slinging maestro of McFlurries, has a completely different identity in Japan. Okay, so it's not that different, but after searches for "What is Ronald McDonald called in Japan?" spiked in Google searches today, we had to know: What is he called? And is this just another internet hoax-turned-headline?!

Turns out, it's true. It's not like he's assuming a new identity, forced into the Big Mac Protection Program after too many run-ins with the Hamburglar. In Japan, he's very much the same McDonald you see in the States: Same red hair, same ketchup-and-mustard-colored garb, even down to the same last name. The only change is that in Japan, he's Donald McDonald, or rather, Donarudo Makudonarudo. Similarly, the chain's charity, the Ronald McDonald House, is known as the Donald McDonald House there.

This decision was made back in 1971, when a businessman who helped open the country's first Mickey D's suggested the swap, deeming it easier to pronounce, according to Business Insider.

While some say that's because it's hard for Japanese speakers to pronounce the letter "r" as it sounds in the English language, Kotaku explains that's an oversimplification. Ronald McDonald in Japanese is Ronarudo Makudonarudo, and having the "Ro" sound so close to the "ru" sound would trip people up, because the very similar &mdash yet different &mdash sounds don't quite roll off the tongue, the site argues. Plus, Japanese audiences were already familiar with "Donarudo," thanks to Donald Duck's popularity when the chain opened there, so it was a more natural fit.

Follow Delish on Instagram.


Ronald McDonald Has A Different Name In Japan

He's started a new life in the Land Of The Rising Sun.

Ronald McDonald, that cheeseburger-slinging maestro of McFlurries, has a completely different identity in Japan. Okay, so it's not that different, but after searches for "What is Ronald McDonald called in Japan?" spiked in Google searches today, we had to know: What is he called? And is this just another internet hoax-turned-headline?!

Turns out, it's true. It's not like he's assuming a new identity, forced into the Big Mac Protection Program after too many run-ins with the Hamburglar. In Japan, he's very much the same McDonald you see in the States: Same red hair, same ketchup-and-mustard-colored garb, even down to the same last name. The only change is that in Japan, he's Donald McDonald, or rather, Donarudo Makudonarudo. Similarly, the chain's charity, the Ronald McDonald House, is known as the Donald McDonald House there.

This decision was made back in 1971, when a businessman who helped open the country's first Mickey D's suggested the swap, deeming it easier to pronounce, according to Business Insider.

While some say that's because it's hard for Japanese speakers to pronounce the letter "r" as it sounds in the English language, Kotaku explains that's an oversimplification. Ronald McDonald in Japanese is Ronarudo Makudonarudo, and having the "Ro" sound so close to the "ru" sound would trip people up, because the very similar &mdash yet different &mdash sounds don't quite roll off the tongue, the site argues. Plus, Japanese audiences were already familiar with "Donarudo," thanks to Donald Duck's popularity when the chain opened there, so it was a more natural fit.

Follow Delish on Instagram.


Ronald McDonald Has A Different Name In Japan

He's started a new life in the Land Of The Rising Sun.

Ronald McDonald, that cheeseburger-slinging maestro of McFlurries, has a completely different identity in Japan. Okay, so it's not that different, but after searches for "What is Ronald McDonald called in Japan?" spiked in Google searches today, we had to know: What is he called? And is this just another internet hoax-turned-headline?!

Turns out, it's true. It's not like he's assuming a new identity, forced into the Big Mac Protection Program after too many run-ins with the Hamburglar. In Japan, he's very much the same McDonald you see in the States: Same red hair, same ketchup-and-mustard-colored garb, even down to the same last name. The only change is that in Japan, he's Donald McDonald, or rather, Donarudo Makudonarudo. Similarly, the chain's charity, the Ronald McDonald House, is known as the Donald McDonald House there.

This decision was made back in 1971, when a businessman who helped open the country's first Mickey D's suggested the swap, deeming it easier to pronounce, according to Business Insider.

While some say that's because it's hard for Japanese speakers to pronounce the letter "r" as it sounds in the English language, Kotaku explains that's an oversimplification. Ronald McDonald in Japanese is Ronarudo Makudonarudo, and having the "Ro" sound so close to the "ru" sound would trip people up, because the very similar &mdash yet different &mdash sounds don't quite roll off the tongue, the site argues. Plus, Japanese audiences were already familiar with "Donarudo," thanks to Donald Duck's popularity when the chain opened there, so it was a more natural fit.

Follow Delish on Instagram.


Ronald McDonald Has A Different Name In Japan

He's started a new life in the Land Of The Rising Sun.

Ronald McDonald, that cheeseburger-slinging maestro of McFlurries, has a completely different identity in Japan. Okay, so it's not that different, but after searches for "What is Ronald McDonald called in Japan?" spiked in Google searches today, we had to know: What is he called? And is this just another internet hoax-turned-headline?!

Turns out, it's true. It's not like he's assuming a new identity, forced into the Big Mac Protection Program after too many run-ins with the Hamburglar. In Japan, he's very much the same McDonald you see in the States: Same red hair, same ketchup-and-mustard-colored garb, even down to the same last name. The only change is that in Japan, he's Donald McDonald, or rather, Donarudo Makudonarudo. Similarly, the chain's charity, the Ronald McDonald House, is known as the Donald McDonald House there.

This decision was made back in 1971, when a businessman who helped open the country's first Mickey D's suggested the swap, deeming it easier to pronounce, according to Business Insider.

While some say that's because it's hard for Japanese speakers to pronounce the letter "r" as it sounds in the English language, Kotaku explains that's an oversimplification. Ronald McDonald in Japanese is Ronarudo Makudonarudo, and having the "Ro" sound so close to the "ru" sound would trip people up, because the very similar &mdash yet different &mdash sounds don't quite roll off the tongue, the site argues. Plus, Japanese audiences were already familiar with "Donarudo," thanks to Donald Duck's popularity when the chain opened there, so it was a more natural fit.

Follow Delish on Instagram.


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